Fiddle whiz Deanie Richardson is premiering her brand-new song "Jack of Diamonds" exclusively for readers of The Boot. The tune features potently powerful vocals from '90s country icon Patty Loveless; press play above to listen.

Richardson provides the vintage-sounding fiddle on "Jack of Diamonds," inspired by the playing on blues legend Blind Lemon Jefferson's version of the folksy, traditional tune. Loveless' Appalachian-tinged alto adds the mournful lyrics, originally sung by workers on American railroads who lost a little bit too much money playing cards.

Tex Ritter, Waylon Jennings, Corb Lund and John Lee Hooker, among other artists, have also released their own versions of this classic song. Richardson tells The Boot that she and Loveless pored over versions of "Jack of Diamonds" before settling on the Blind Lemon Jefferson take with the help of producer Emory Gordy Jr., Loveless' husband.

"I love the rawness of her voice and really wanted to take advantage of Patty’s mountain soulful sound," Richardson tells The Boot. "We threw many things back and forth for a couple of months before Emory approached me about "Jack of Diamonds." I knew it as an old-time fiddle tune / waltz, but Emory found [this] more soulful, bluesy version ... It was perfect for Patty’s voice, so we combined the two versions to come up with the one on my project."

Richardson and Loveless first met in the mid-'90s, when Richardson began touring and recording with the chart-topping artist. "She is by far my favorite singer, a huge inspiration to me and, I’d say, one of my dearest friends; in fact, I consider her family," Richardson shares. "I can’t tell you how thrilled I am to have her on this record with me."

A member of the bluegrass act Sister Sadie, Richardson has also shared the stage with countless artists, including Vince Gill and Bob Seger, and makes frequent appearances with the Grand Ole Opry house band. "Jack of Diamonds" will appear on her forthcoming new album, titled Love Hard Work Hard Play Hard, set for release on Jan. 18 via Pinecastle Records.

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