There's nothing like a cold glass of beer -- just ask any number of country artists. They've got plenty to say about whiskey and wine, too, but beer and country music have a special relationship.

It's almost impossible to choose the best country songs about beer, but we at The Boot have given it a shot. Is your favorite tune on the list? Pour yourself a cold one (if you're of age, of course) and read on to find out.

  • 10

    "I Like Beer"

    Tom T. Hall

    Sudsiest Lyrics: "I like beer / It makes me a jolly good fellow / I like beer / It helps me unwind / And sometimes it makes me feel mellow."

    You've got to respect a straightforward song like this one: Hall likes beer. It makes him jolly and mellow. End of story. Along the way, he also manages to throw shade at other alcoholic options, reminding us that "whiskey's too rough, champagne costs too much, vodka puts my mouth in gear." Fair enough, sir; beer it is.

  • 9

    "Beer With Jesus"

    Thomas Rhett

    Sudsiest Lyrics: "If I could have a beer with Jesus / I'd put my whole paycheck in that jukebox / Fill it up with nothing but the good stuff / Sit somewhere we couldn't see a clock."

    This song has Rhett imagining what he would do and what he would ask if he could have a beer with Jesus. He pictures himself letting Jesus do most of the talking, but takes time to ask questions like "How'd you turn the other cheek?" and "Is Heaven really just beyond the stars?" Rhett admits that probably "no one would believe it," but no matter.

  • 8

    "Beer Money"

    Kip Moore

    Sudsiest Lyrics: "So come on, come on / Baby, I'm buyin' / I got enough to last us all night / You got the kiss that tastes like honey / And I got a little beer money."

    A lot of beer songs celebrate being down to your last dime and saving it to spend on beer (it's not good financial advice, but it does seem to lend itself to some wild nights). In this song, Moore advocates dancing in the dark, blowing out the speakers and just hoping that he and his girl "get lucky and stay out of jail." As for those honey kisses mixed with beer ... dibs on the craft brew recipe!

  • 7

    "Drinking Beer"

    Ray Scott

    Sudsiest Lyrics: "Drinkin' beer out on the lake / In a big ol' boat, kickin' up a wake / It's a good day to be anywhere drinkin' beer."

    Scott is out to drink beer in as many places and while doing as many things as he can. Just some of his suggestions include on a lake, at a go-kart race, while plowing corn, as you're leaning up against a John Deere, at a bar, on the porch ... he could go on. He wants to drink beer all over God's green earth and beyond -- literally. He ends the song with a wish: "When I leave this world, I hope they're all up there drinkin' beer."

  • 6

    "A Six Pack to Go"

    Hank Thompson

    Sudsiest Lyrics: "Well, I don't have enough to pay my rent / I ain't gonna worry, though / I've got time for one more round / And a six pack to go."

    This classic has been notably covered by Leon Russell and George Strait, but it's Thompson's original that captures the spirit of the narrator who's spent his whole paycheck (including rent money) on beer and has just enough left for one more more six pack. We never find out if Thompson gets his beer to go, but we have a feeling that if the bartender was concerned with keeping his liquor license, this song may have a disappointing ending for the narrator.

  • 5

    "Beer Thirty"

    Brooks & Dunn

    Sudsiest Lyrics: "I like to two-step, she likes to rock / That clock on the wall, it rings, it chimes / It's beer thirty, a honky-tonk time."

    This song does for honky-tonks and beer drinkers what "It's Five O'Clock Somewhere" did for hurricane drinks with tiny umbrellas. Both songs play fast and loose with the concept of acceptable drinking times, and Brooks & Dunn open up the entire clock. As the song says, "life's too short -- let's get to livin' it."

  • 4

    "Beer Run (B Double E Double Are You In?)"

    Garth Brooks feat. George Jones

    Sudsiest Lyrics: "I guess a couple dozen cases doesn't last too long / Come tomorrow morning, it'll all be gone / Then it's turn around, leave town, sounds again / Like a B double E double are you in?"

    Here's a trick: Try playing this song for anyone who's been drinking as much as the guys Brooks is singing about. Chances are, they won't be able to figure out whether the country star is spelling "beer run" ("B double E double R-U-N") or if he's singing "are you in?" The title gives us a clue, but we maintain that Brooks is slurring his words (and letters) just enough to mess with anyone who's had a "quick sack, 12-pack, back again." It's Hooked on Phonics ... for adults.

  • 3

    "There's a Tear in My Beer"

    Hank Williams

    Sudsiest Lyrics: "There's a tear in my beer / 'Cause I'm cryin' for you, dear / You are on my lonely mind."

    Beer songs tend to be either cheerful and celebratory or weepy and lovesick. This one is definitely the latter. The whole song is a heartbroken lament, in which Williams claims that he's going to "keep drinkin' 'til I can't move a toe, and then maybe my heart won't hurt me so." Hank Williams Jr. also recorded a version of this song, but no matter which version you prefer, one question remains: If it's true that "into these last nine beers, I have shed a million tears," what does that do to the ABV?

  • 2

    "Somebody Buy This Cowgirl a Beer"

    Shelly West

    Sudsiest Lyrics: "The jukebox is playing "Pop a Top" for me / And I love this beer-drinking atmosphere / Before I lose my self control, I'm gonna let the good times roll / Somebody buy this cowgirl a beer."

    This beer-loving song has layers: West demands that the bartender pour her a beer -- she's fine with Colorado Kool-Aid (aka Coors), Busch or Hamm's -- while, appropriately, "Pop a Top" plays in the background. If you want to go deeper into this world of beer, try listening to either "Pop a Top" or "Colorado Kool-Aid" ... or you could just enjoy this song. And, please, somebody, buy the lady a beer!

  • 1

    "Beer for My Horses"

    Toby Keith feat. Willie Nelson

    Sudsiest Lyrics: "When the gun smoke settles, we'll sing a victory tune / We'll all meet back at the local saloon / We'll raise up our glasses against evil forces / Singing 'Whiskey for my men, beer for my horses.'"

    This song is all about vigilante justice: Keith and Nelson are fed up with the corruption, explosions and robberies (to name a few) they keep seeing on television, and with the help of whiskey and beer, they've decided to take the law into their own hands. We can only hope PETA never caught wind of their plan!